Rep. Jamie Raskin: Trump Campaigned Like William Jennings Bryan but Has Richest Cabinet in US History

America needs to know that all of the protests and the popular participation is working. The Women’s March set the whole context for discussion about what is going to happen here because we know that President Trump campaigned like William Jennings Bryan, like he was a big populist. He was going to be on the side of the working people. But he got in, and the very people he denounced, like Goldman Sachs, have come to run his government. It is a Wall Street Cabinet. It is the wealthiest Cabinet in the history of the United States. That is who this government represents today. That is what this tax plan represents today.

— Jamie Raskin (D–MD)

President Trump’s Tax Plan, House Floor, April 27, 2017

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Rep. Brad Sherman: Not Since Galileo “Have Science Deniers Had Such Powerful Friends”

Brad Sherman

Last Saturday was Earth Day, and tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of people across this country had to march in favor of science because, not since Galileo was condemned by the Inquisition for asserting that the Earth orbits the Sun, not since Galileo was condemned by the Inquisition have science deniers had such powerful friends.

— Brad Sherman (D–CA)

Confronting Trump on Anti-Science Agenda and Taxes, House Floor, April 25, 2017

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Rep. Andy Biggs: Trump’s First 100 Days Most Productive Since Truman

In his first 100 days, President Trump has enacted more pieces of legislation than any other President since Truman, facilitated the earliest Supreme Court confirmation since 1881, eliminated many onerous regulations to restore economic optimism and opportunity, protected the sanctity of life, and driven illegal border crossings to a 17-year low. His accomplishments are truly remarkable.

—Rep. Andy Biggs (R–AZ)

First 100 Days of President Trump’s Administration, House Floor, April 27, 2017

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Rep. Alma Adams: The Founding Fathers Sought to Protect “Artistic Expression”

Alma Adams

Under the First Amendment, all art forms and all artistic expressions are constitutionally protected. Our Founding Fathers who created our country and launched our Nation as the world’s role model in democracy believed that freedom of speech and freedom of the press were important enough to guarantee protection in our country’s founding documents. If our Founding Fathers, the brightest minds of that generation, thought that artistic expression was important enough to protect in our Bill of Rights, then what right do we have to take this away and censor the artistic community?

—Rep. Alma Adams (D–NC)

Removal Of David Pulphus’ Painting From The Cannon Tunnel, House Floor, April 26, 2017

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Rep. Lamar Smith: Trump’s Negative Press “Higher Than Any Other President”

Lamar Smith

A new report by the Media Research Center shows that coverage of President Trump by the broadcast networks has been 89 percent negative, higher than any other President.

—Rep. Lamar Smith (R–TX)

Media Bias Sets Record, House Floor, April 25, 2017

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Trump: “No Politician in History … Has Been Treated Worse or More Unfairly”

Look at the way I’ve been treated lately — (laughter) — especially by the media.  No politician in history — and I say this with great surety — has been treated worse or more unfairly.  You can’t let them get you down.  You can’t let the critics and the naysayers get in the way of your dreams.  (Applause.)  I guess that’s why I — thank you.  I guess that’s why we won.

Sarah Sanders: Johnson Amendment Akin to Silencing Martin Luther King

Look, I think it’s very hard to argue that a pastor or another faith leader shouldn’t be able to speak out about morality in the public square.  I think that it would be almost like Martin Luther King, Jr. shouldn’t have been allowed to speak out against George Wallace.  I don’t think anybody in this room would argue that that would be an appropriate thing to do, and that is what the Johnson Amendment currently does.  And we see this as a hurdle to freedom of speech, and certainly something that should be protected.

—Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Sanders

Press Gaggle, May 4, 2017

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Rep. Joseph Crowley: Potato Famine “Very Much the Same Situation” as in Africa and Yemen

Joseph Crowley

In Ireland at the time, food was actually being exported out of Ireland while people starved. So it was starvation not only because of food loss, but also because of politics and repression–very much the same situation that exists in parts of Africa and in Yemen–and only politics could ultimately change the underlying conditions in Ireland.

—Rep. Joseph Crowley (D–NY)

Relating to Efforts to Respond to the Famine in South Sudan, House Floor, April 25, 2017

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Rep. Louie Gohmert: Ninth Circuit Has Outlived Its Historical Purpose

Louie Gohmert

There was that time when Manifest Destiny was being pursued, people were moving West. The areas West were not actual States within the United States. There was a lawlessness. People were yearning in those territories to be States so that they could count on the Federal Government to provide fairness–ultimate fairness–and provide a life that would be lived under the United States Constitution. They felt, in those days, if we could just get the Federal Government to have a Federal marshal here and a Federal Court here, wow, life would be so much better. Now we have seen it has lived beyond the usefulness it once had and has become quite a burden to overcome in reaching fairness and constitutionality.

—Rep. Louie Gohmert (R–TX)

Issues of the Day, House Floor, April 26, 2017

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