Sen. Ron Wyden: Obamacare Senate session the second-longest in US history

Ron WydenAs of now, there will not be a single Democratic amendment adopted in the Finance Committee. When the legislation [the Affordable Care Act] went to the floor, the Senate spent 25 consecutive legislative days on healthcare reform–the second longest consecutive session in history. That is how the legislative process ought to look: The committees do the hard work in the open, gather input from the American people, have a chance–Democrats and Republicans–to work together.

—Sen. Ron Wyden (D–OR)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Thomas Carper: Obamacare “looked a lot like” what Republicans offered in 1993

Thomas CarperWe did our homework and found that in 1993, when First Lady Hillary Clinton came up and worked on something called HillaryCare, the Republicans felt like they had to come up with an alternative, which was provided by the people at Heritage, a Republican think tank.

When Mitt Romney was Governor of Massachusetts and was going to run for President, he took that 1993 legislation, which called for creating exchanges in every State and marketplaces and large purchasing pools where people who didn’t have healthcare coverage could buy healthcare coverage in their State.

[The Affordable Care Act] looked a lot like what was offered in 1993, and it looked a lot like what was actually adopted and I think worked with relative success in Massachusetts.

—Sen. Thomas Carper (D–DE)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Kamala Harris: GOP health care bill “is the least popular piece of legislation in modern history”

Kamala HarrisOnly 20 percent of Americans support this bill. A majority opposes it in every State in this country. It is the least popular piece of legislation in modern history.

—Sen. Kamala Harris (D–CA)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Jeff Merkley: Markup of Obamacare in HELP committee was its longest ever

Jeff MerkleyIn that year [2009], in the HELP Committee–Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee–there were 47 hearings, roundtables, and walkthroughs, a markup that went for more than a month–the longest markup in that committee in the history of the United States of America; a markup that considered over 300 amendments; a markup with, in fact, a group of Senators, bipartisan, sitting around the table with the television cameras rolling while they debated those amendments and voted on those amendments [to the Affordable Care Act].

—Sen. Jeff Merkley (D–OR)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Dianne Feinstein: Not since before WWI has there been “such a secret, partisan process for passing a major bill”

Dianne FeinsteinI just have to say, this is the least transparent process for a major piece of legislation I have seen in my 24 years in the Senate. Former Senate Historian Don Ritchie said that you have to look back before World War I to find another example of such a secret, partisan process for passing a major bill. The Senate healthcare bill in fact is being written behind closed doors.

—Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D–CA)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Bernie Sanders: Length of Obamacare deliberations were record-setting

Bernie SandersIn 2009 and 2010, the Finance Committee held 53 hearings, meetings, negotiations, and walkthroughs on the Affordable Care Act. That committee marked up the Affordable Care Act for 8 days. That was the longest markup in 22 years, and adopted during that process were over 10 Republican amendments. When the bill was considered on the Senate floor, the Senate spent 25 consecutive days in session on health reform–the second longest session in history.

—Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–VT)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Rand Paul: Selling arms to create jobs? Eisenhower warned about this

Rand PaulThere is probably no greater purveyor of hatred for Christianity and Judaism than Saudi Arabia. We should not be giving them weapons.

Some will argue that it is a jobs program. Well, isn’t that swell. We are going to give money to people who behead you and crucify you to create jobs. That should never be the way we make a decision about arms sales in our country.
A famous Republican and general, General Dwight Eisenhower, Continue reading Sen. Rand Paul: Selling arms to create jobs? Eisenhower warned about this

Sen. Tester: Legacy of the 1917 Granite Mountain disaster is “a unification of the U.S. labor movement and an unprecedented push for labor laws”

Jon TesterToday I wish to honor the victims and survivors of the Granite Mountain Mine disaster and commemorate the lasting legacy of the labor movement in Montana and across this nation.

The Granite Mountain disaster led to a unification of the U.S. labor movement and an unprecedented push for labor laws that are still in effect today.One hundred years later, we are thankful for our union brothers and sisters who fought and continue to fight for better pay, safer working conditions, civil rights, and a stronger economy for working Americans.

—Sen. Jon Tester (D–MT)

Granite Mountain Mine Disaster,  Senate Floor, June 8, 2017

See also: Sen. Daines: Legacy of the 1917 Granite Mountain disaster is “a culture in mining communities and industry that prioritizes safety”

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Sen. Daines: Legacy of the 1917 Granite Mountain disaster is “a culture in mining communities and industry that prioritizes safety”

Steve DainesToday I wish to remember metal mining’s greatest disaster, the Granite Mountain/Speculator Mine Fire that took place 100 years ago in Butte, MT, that claimed the lives of 168 men.

One hundred years after this tragedy, we are also reminded of how far we have come in hard rock mining. Continue reading Sen. Daines: Legacy of the 1917 Granite Mountain disaster is “a culture in mining communities and industry that prioritizes safety”

Sen. Michael Bennet: Using the Marshall Plan to critique Trump’s foreign policy

Michael BennetAs the recent terrorist attack unfolded in London, President Trump took to Twitter to promote his political agenda and sow fear in the wake of that attack. In the face of challenges like extremism and instability that demand 40-year strategies like the ones President Truman had in mind, President Trump is conducting his foreign policy 140 characters at a time.

Like the Marshall Plan, the Paris Agreement recognized that in the modern world there is no “over there” anymore. Today, over there is here, and here is over there, and our President fundamentally doesn’t understand it. Continue reading Sen. Michael Bennet: Using the Marshall Plan to critique Trump’s foreign policy