Sen. Mike Lee: We’ve lost sight of founder’s vision of federalism

Mike LeeSenator Lee made the comments below while discussing his new book, Written out of History. Historians Andrew Burstein and Nancy Isenberg reviewed Lee’s book here.

What has been lost are the stories of our early forgotten founders, those who taught us about things like federalism, about separation of powers.

One of the things that we have lost today is the understanding that not all power is supposed to be vested in the federal government. Continue reading Sen. Mike Lee: We’ve lost sight of founder’s vision of federalism

Rep. Matt Cartwright: Health care tort reform runs afoul of the Magna Carta

Matt CartwrightMr. Chairman, here we are dealing with some amount of irony with HR 1215. The year 1215 was the year the Magna Carta was signed, something that created the seeds of the American right to jury trial, for Heaven’s sake.

You know, we were pleased to hear Representative Duncan from Tennessee say: “Conservatives believe strongly in the jury system.”

And I do, too, and Americans do, too.

Our Founding Fathers believed in it.

Here in America, where we trust juries to decide life and death for criminal defendants, why wouldn’t we trust them to set a proper and fair dollar amount on a malpractice case?

—Rep. Matt Cartwright (D–PA)

Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017, House Floor, June 28, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Rep. Steve King: Magna Carta wasn’t concerned with medical malpractice claims

Steve KingI thought the gentleman from Pennsylvania’s look at HR 1215 was a really deft way to focus on this and speak about the Magna Carta, but there wasn’t anybody back in old England in that time that had any shot at filing a liability claim, let alone receiving a frivolous claim that would make one individual vastly wealthy at the expense of a lot of other folks.

So this is something that has accumulated over the last 502 years since the Magna Carta was signed.

—Rep. Steve King (R–IA)

Protecting Access to Care Act of 2017, House Floor, June 28, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee: Obamacare fulfilled Harry Truman’s promise

Sheila Jackson-Lee

In 1949, Harry Truman became the first sitting President to propose universal healthcare for all Americans as part of the “Fair Deal.” On March 23, 2010, with the stroke of President Obama’s pen, the American people received this part of the “Fair Deal.”

—Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee (D–TX)

Wealth Care over Healthcare and Contributions of Caribbean Americans, House Floor, June 26, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Sen. Cory Booker: Unlike AHCA deliberations, Constitutional Convention was “public, open, transparent”

Cory BookerWhat is interesting is, if you think about the forming of our country in that debate–again, the Constitutional Convention was public, open, transparent–issues were debated.

In fact, through the process, the very Constitutional Convention of this country–perhaps some of the biggest issues of humanity–were debated in an open forum. We have records of those discussions, records of those deliberations. Everything from the representation that each State should have to issues as profound as slavery were right there, out in the open.

—Sen. Cory Booker (D–NJ)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Sen. Jeff Merkley: Affordable healthcare within scope of FDR’s and founders’ vision

Jeff MerkleyHonor the role and responsibility of representing all of the people of your State, not simply powerful companies and your richest constituents but all of your citizens. That was the vision on which our country was founded, and that is the spirit in which Franklin Roosevelt said: This test of our progress is not whether we give more of the abundance to those who have the most, but enough to those who have little. Enough means affordable, accessible healthcare for every single person in America.

—Sen. Jeff Merkley (D–OR)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Sen. Cory Booker: Tradition of the Senate is to “slow things down”

Cory BookerWe have seen this body, in the very short period of time I have been here, begin to undermine not just things that happened under the Obama administration but to undermine traditions that go back decades, if not more than a century.

The longest filibuster on this floor … It was actually almost exactly 60 years ago. Continue reading Sen. Cory Booker: Tradition of the Senate is to “slow things down”

Sen. Christopher Murphy: Senate not fulfilling role envisioned by Connecticut Compromise

Christopher MurphyThere is, right outside this Chamber, a picture of the authors of the Connecticut Compromise, two of the Connecticut delegates to the Constitutional Convention.

The idea of the House is that it is supposed to respond, perhaps, more quickly to the temporary passions of the public, which is ironic, given that the passion of the public today is in deep opposition to this piece of legislation.

This place [the Senate] is supposed to be able to step back and look at the long term and look at the long view.

—Sen. Christopher Murphy (D–CT)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Sen. Charles Schumer: Markup for Obamacare “one of the longest in history”

Charles SchumerThey considered nearly 300 amendments [to the Affordable Care Act] during the 13-day markup. That was one of the longest in history, as it should have been on such a major bill.

—Sen. Charles Schumer (D–NY)
Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment

Sen. Ron Wyden: Obamacare Senate session the second-longest in US history

Ron WydenAs of now, there will not be a single Democratic amendment adopted in the Finance Committee. When the legislation [the Affordable Care Act] went to the floor, the Senate spent 25 consecutive legislative days on healthcare reform–the second longest consecutive session in history. That is how the legislative process ought to look: The committees do the hard work in the open, gather input from the American people, have a chance–Democrats and Republicans–to work together.

—Sen. Ron Wyden (D–OR)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

Historians: Rate or comment