Sen. Thomas Carper: Obamacare “looked a lot like” what Republicans offered in 1993

Thomas CarperWe did our homework and found that in 1993, when First Lady Hillary Clinton came up and worked on something called HillaryCare, the Republicans felt like they had to come up with an alternative, which was provided by the people at Heritage, a Republican think tank.

When Mitt Romney was Governor of Massachusetts and was going to run for President, he took that 1993 legislation, which called for creating exchanges in every State and marketplaces and large purchasing pools where people who didn’t have healthcare coverage could buy healthcare coverage in their State.

[The Affordable Care Act] looked a lot like what was offered in 1993, and it looked a lot like what was actually adopted and I think worked with relative success in Massachusetts.

—Sen. Thomas Carper (D–DE)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Kamala Harris: GOP health care bill “is the least popular piece of legislation in modern history”

Kamala HarrisOnly 20 percent of Americans support this bill. A majority opposes it in every State in this country. It is the least popular piece of legislation in modern history.

—Sen. Kamala Harris (D–CA)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Jeff Merkley: Markup of Obamacare in HELP committee was its longest ever

Jeff MerkleyIn that year [2009], in the HELP Committee–Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee–there were 47 hearings, roundtables, and walkthroughs, a markup that went for more than a month–the longest markup in that committee in the history of the United States of America; a markup that considered over 300 amendments; a markup with, in fact, a group of Senators, bipartisan, sitting around the table with the television cameras rolling while they debated those amendments and voted on those amendments [to the Affordable Care Act].

—Sen. Jeff Merkley (D–OR)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Dianne Feinstein: Not since before WWI has there been “such a secret, partisan process for passing a major bill”

Dianne FeinsteinI just have to say, this is the least transparent process for a major piece of legislation I have seen in my 24 years in the Senate. Former Senate Historian Don Ritchie said that you have to look back before World War I to find another example of such a secret, partisan process for passing a major bill. The Senate healthcare bill in fact is being written behind closed doors.

—Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D–CA)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Bernie Sanders: Length of Obamacare deliberations were record-setting

Bernie SandersIn 2009 and 2010, the Finance Committee held 53 hearings, meetings, negotiations, and walkthroughs on the Affordable Care Act. That committee marked up the Affordable Care Act for 8 days. That was the longest markup in 22 years, and adopted during that process were over 10 Republican amendments. When the bill was considered on the Senate floor, the Senate spent 25 consecutive days in session on health reform–the second longest session in history.

—Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–VT)

Healthcare Legislation,  Senate Floor, June 19, 2017

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Sen. Jeff Merkley: “Trumpcare” the “opposite” of founders’ vision

Jeff MerkleyOur Nation and our government were founded on a principle that can be summed up in three words: “We the People,” the first three words of our Constitution, the three words that our Founders wrote in supersized font so that no matter who you were you would remember that this is the guiding mission of our form of government. This is the guiding mission of the Constitution. Continue reading Sen. Jeff Merkley: “Trumpcare” the “opposite” of founders’ vision

Rep. Louie Gohmert: American Revolution wasn’t fought to “pass more and more bills”

Louie GohmertWhy I think it is appropriate to bring this up as we approach Memorial Day is people have not fought throughout our history–going back to 1775, 1776, on to 1783 and the winning of the American Revolution, on through each of the wars that has been fought in the name of liberty–they didn’t fight so that we could come to the floor and pass more and more bills and create more and more government.

—Rep. Louie Gohmert (R–TX)

Issues of the Day, House Floor, May 25, 2017

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Rep. Louie Gohmert: In the Past “You Just Paid for Your Health Care”

Louie Gohmert

It was in the last 40 or 50 years that, when people brought up health insurance, it really was insurance. You paid a very small premium each month against some unforeseeable event out there in the future, a catastrophic disease or injury. So you just paid a small premium, like term life insurance, to ensure against something you hope never would happen. In the meantime, you just paid for your health care.

—Rep. Louie Gohmert (R–TX)

Health Care, House Floor, April 28, 2017

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