Sen. Tester: Legacy of the 1917 Granite Mountain disaster is “a unification of the U.S. labor movement and an unprecedented push for labor laws”

Jon TesterToday I wish to honor the victims and survivors of the Granite Mountain Mine disaster and commemorate the lasting legacy of the labor movement in Montana and across this nation.

The Granite Mountain disaster led to a unification of the U.S. labor movement and an unprecedented push for labor laws that are still in effect today.One hundred years later, we are thankful for our union brothers and sisters who fought and continue to fight for better pay, safer working conditions, civil rights, and a stronger economy for working Americans.

—Sen. Jon Tester (D–MT)

Granite Mountain Mine Disaster,  Senate Floor, June 8, 2017

See also: Sen. Daines: Legacy of the 1917 Granite Mountain disaster is “a culture in mining communities and industry that prioritizes safety”

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Rep. Bradley Byrne: Union Membership Fell Because Unions “Limit People”

Bradley Byrne

We just heard a lot about the labor movement and big bosses. I got transported back in my mind. You would have thought we were in the 1930s and 1940s. I don’t know if my colleague from Colorado has been paying attention, but union membership is at its lowest level since the 1940s right now because, even after 8 years of the most pro-union administration in decades, union membership continues to fall, and it continues to fall because workers in America aren’t buying what they are selling because a lot of what they are selling is exactly what we hear is the opposition to this bill, which is: Let’s limit people; let’s restrict people; let’s come up with all these things to tell them what they can’t do instead of telling them what they can.

— Bradley Byrne (R–AL)

Working Families Flexibility Act of 2017, House Floor, May 2, 2017

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